The Royal Albert Hall Audio Tours

36 reviews for audio tours in London

Join 4500+ happy customers who use self-guided tours with entrance tickets
Katrien
4
21 days ago
It was an interesting tour.
Mitali
5
21 days ago
The audio tour was extremely well planned, paced & detailed. One of the best audio toured I’ve listened to from all my international travels including museums in France. I would highly recommend this to everyone. The navigation instructions are accurate & the images in each step help you easily find the halls on your own. We are not familiar with Russian language but could easily navigate & appreciate the art & history at the museum thanks to this. Very well done & thanks a lot for putting this together 😊
Adam
5
about 2 months ago
Thank you so much.
id15441
4
about 2 months ago
App not stable. Final destination closed. But all in all nice experience
Anne-Marie
5
about 2 months ago
It was nice to do a walking city tour through London, we went through spots we never even thought we'd see! We really enjoyed ourselves!
1/8
The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall on the northern edge of South Kensington, London. One of the United Kingdom's most treasured and distinctive buildings, it is held in trust for the nation and managed by a registered charity which receives no government funding. It can seat 5,272.Since the hall's opening by Queen Victoria in 1871, the world's leading artists from many performance genres have appeared on its stage. It is the venue for the Proms concerts, which have been held there every summer since 1941. It is host to more than 390 shows in the main auditorium annually, including classical, rock and pop concerts, ballet, opera, film screenings with live orchestral accompaniment, sports, awards ceremonies, school and community events, and charity performances and banquets. A further 400 events are held each year in the non-auditorium spaces. The hall was originally supposed to have been called the Central Hall of Arts and Sciences, but the name was changed to the Royal Albert Hall of Arts and Sciences by Queen Victoria upon laying the Hall's foundation stone in 1867, in memory of her husband, Prince Albert, who had died six years earlier. It forms the practical part of a memorial to the Prince Consort; the decorative part is the Albert Memorial directly to the north in Kensington Gardens, now separated from the Hall by Kensington Gore.